Monday, March 10, 2014

National Wormhole Week and Escalation

It's National Wormhole Week!

Hosted by Stephen Tremp, (celebrating his upcoming release, Escalation) Alex J. Cavanaugh, and L.Diane Wolfe, Wormfest is here!

Rules are simple:
Name one thing where science advances mankind, and one where technology will go too far and set us back. They can be the same thing or different.

First idea: Hover-technology. You know, like they show in Back to the Future. I want one of those boards - except I probably would want one with training handlebars, or I might want one that I could lay on top of and "fly" like superman - a hover-boogie-board, surfing the air currents. I would probably look pretty ridiculous but it would be fun.

I'm not sure it advances mankind any, so . . .

 I'm going to go with what I had last year. I know . . . I should have been more imaginative, but I'm still super excited about new prosthetics and robotic technologies working together. I think the combination definitely is advancing mankind - for the disabled and the abled. Think about it - any exoskeleton device that can be used for prosthetic purposes could also be used as an exoskeleton suit for anyone - Robocop mixed with Real Steel with people inside. . . .and then of course, there's just robotics in general. and we all know the potential downfall there, right? Terminator, Matrix?

Maybe I just get excited about robotics because one of my daughters is interested in the field, and I get excited about prosthetic advances because I know at least three people with prosthetic aids - my dad, my brother-in-law, a friend, and another friend's daughter.

How do you imagine science advancing mankind? or setting us back?

And let's help Stephen Tremp celebrate his latest book Escalation!

Escalation Synopsis:

“I know not with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones” - Albert Einstein
In Escalation, the final installment to Stephen Tremp’s Breakthrough Trilogy, a seemingly innocent discovery in Einstein-Rosen Bridges, or wormholes, becomes a Pandora’s Box—opening doors to other unexpected and unpredictable realities such as parallel universes, time/space travel, and an evil hitchhiker from another dimension.

Chase Manhattan has survived attempts on his life from numerous sources in his effort to destroy the technology. But he is far from safe. Now Chase and his comrades must not only break world renowned physicist Professor Nicholas Fischer out of prison a second time, but also smuggle him across hostile borders in Europe and the Middle East to prevent events threatening to spiral into World War III.

At stake: an end to Western civilization as we know it. The result: an epic clash where science and the supernatural take center stage, vying for mankind’s destiny. The setting is global as the world divides into an East vs. West climactic battle. The action is swift, adrenaline-charged, and non-stop. Unending twists and turns will keep the reader turning pages and wanting more.

Together, Breakthrough, Opening, and Escalation follow the lives of the unlikely participants from innocence to a coming of age through sacrifice, betrayal, passion, lust, unconditional love, and hope. Escalation is an international thriller and will appeal to fans of modern-day science fiction, action, horror, and a bit of romance.

26 comments:

  1. That's cool it's your daughter's field of study.
    Thanks for participating in the blogfest!

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    1. Well, she's a teen so her ideas for areas of study varies from time to time - but it's all either science or dance or theatre . . . a friend of ours told her to create dancing robots. :)

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  2. As I didn't read last years' it was a pleasure to read it today.
    Yvonne.

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  3. Stephen's latest sounds fascinating! I'm so thankful there are minds that work so differently from mine that can imagine and invent and create scientific devices.

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    1. I think his books sounds really good too, and I'm thankful that scientific minds are at work creating new possibilities. :)

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  4. Think of all the people who could walk on their own.

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  5. Great choice. Because it really helps people so much to stay mobile. And a big congrats to Stephen on his new book.

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    1. It does help people to stay mobile - it's a huge part of our lives.

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  6. You've chosen to stick with a very exciting scientific development. Here's another wish for a successful launch for Stephen!

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  7. I love Stephen Tremp's writing....and I love your blog! Glad to have time to come back to the Blogosphere so I can read your messages again :)

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  8. I'm going to second your prosthetic/robotics technology since I already know I'd fall off a hoverboard, lol.

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    1. I would probably have to have one with safety belts. :)

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  9. It seems that for every advancement we have in technology and science, there's some way our civilization can be set back. The pros often outweigh the cons but there's often a lot of moral wrestling among it all.

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    1. That's very true - although I think that prosthetics have very few cons.

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  10. I do like how prosthetics are advancing. My father-in-law's young grandson had his arm taken off in an lawnmower accident (don't ride on lawnmowers with your kids!!!) and they've equipped him with an amazing arm. I can only imagine by the time he's an adult how advanced prosthetics will become.

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    1. Oh, I used to ride on my dad's lap on the riding lawn mower until I started driving it myself at the age of 7. Thankfully, I only lost my favorite doll to the lawn mower and not anything else. I'm so sorry for your father-in-law's grandson, and also thankful that he has an amazing prosthetic arm!

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  11. Robotics is a fascinating subject. Scientific advancement usually starts with the aim to help or better humans and the Earth. It's sad when it is turned against us by those who don't care about how harmful it can be.

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    1. I agree, Fanny. Scientific advancement can do wonders for all of us, as long as we remember ethics and responsibility.

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  12. Good luck to Stephen!
    Dropping by from the Wormfest. As for robotics, yes they can be valuable in certain industries, but when we expect them to think for us, we may get what we ask for in a way we didn't expect.

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  13. Great choice Tyrean!
    And it makes me think of our very own "blade runner" and his Paralympic achievements (whose trial is dominating the media at the moment...)
    Writer In Transit

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  14. Physically speaking, robotics are awesome. People who have endured birth-defects and accidents are greatly helped by robotic prosthetics in ways we never though possible. I love that. It's just the freaky cloning and robot-warriors we have to watch out for.

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  15. Hope I'm better late than never here...
    This is a subject I've touhed on a little myself. I think robotics are and can be very helpful to humanity, as long as we don't let it get to our heads. As long as we focus on helping those in need, it'll be all good.
    Great post.

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Thanks for taking time to share your awesomeness!